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H is for Hypovolaemia - Reversible Causes of Cardiac Arrest

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Absolute hypovolaemia is the term used to describe the loss of volume of fluid from the body. Relative hypovolaemia is the term used when there is shifting or inappropriate redistribution of body fluids within the body. Hypovolaemic shock is a significant volume loss or redistribution of body fluid.

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Absolute hypovolaemia is the term used to describe the loss of volume of fluid from the body (e.g. during haemorrhage). Relative hypovolaemia is the term used when there is shifting or inappropriate redistribution of body fluids within the body (e.g. major burn trauma). When there is significant acute volume loss or redistribution of body fluid, the patient is at risk of hypovolaemic shock.

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Meet the educator

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Cheryl Prescott
Cheryl is a Nurse Educator, living in Brisbane, Australia, with an extensive background in clinical nursing across multiple specialties, including coronary care, cardiology and acute medicine. She is a passionate advocate for accessible, meaningful education, quality and research that supports nursing practice and improves patient care. She is a major proponent of the #FOANed movement, which advocates creation, curation and sharing of free, open-access nursing education resources via social media. She is also involved in an international campaign, #WhyWeDoResearch, as she strongly believes that involvement in research, at whatever level possible, is a key responsibility of all healthcare professionals. Only by investing time, energy and resources in sharing and developing our knowledge can we move forward and meet our future challenges.
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Benjamin Stansfield
27 Sep 2020
Happy with this article and this information as it pertains to the area of work that I am aiming for. It was a good reinforcement of the knowledge base I already have but I also discovered some new statistics as well.
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